Tagged: transparency

State projects and county budget visualizations – a collaboration with Transparency International Slovenia

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These two projects are a result of recent collaboration with Transparency International Slovenia. The datasets were provided by the state, and I was asked to develop visualizations that would structure the information in an accessible way. Much help was also provided by members of Institut Jožef Štefan.

State project browser

The first project is a browser of all projects, initiated by state institutions, from 1991 on. The idea was to let users discover, where and for what purposes the money goes in their county. The dataset and visualization allow for exploration by various categories, as well as time.

The projects in the dataset also contain projects that are still in the planning phase, and won’t be completed until year 2025. With this tool, citizens can hopefully inspect the planned expenditures for roads, water sources, and other categories of infrastructure, culture and other fields of development, and compare that with their own expectations.

It allows browsing and filtering of projects by statistical regions and counties, as well as displaying the timeline of all projects, which is basically an  expandable version of a Gantt chart.

To see the interactive project website, click here, or click the image below.

State projects app
State projects app

The original data is provided on the project’s “About” page.

County budget browser

The new project is a straightforward visualization of county budgets. The budgets are displayed as dynamic, zoomable hierarchical (“sunburst”) diagrams. They react to each other, allowing a side-by-side comparison of budgets of two user-selected counties.

The visualization enables users to delve into expenses and incomes of all Slovenian counties on separate tabs.

To see the interactive project website, click here, or click the image below.

County budgets app
County budgets app

 

Technology and design

The data cleanup and preparation was done with some Python scripts. The sunburst diagram accepts hierarchical data in a tree format, so this provided an interesting exercise of converting a tabular dataset into a nested dictionary of optional depth.

The visualizations were done in d3, which is really an indispensable tool for any serious work in online visualization.

Both projects were minimalistically, yet expertly designed by Tomaž Plahuta (Bitnik, Eno).

Check out the projects and let me know your opinion in the comments!